Science and Technology

Dangers and questions of the Zuckerberg era

This year the Worldwide Web is thirty years old. For the first time since 1435, a citizen from Brazil could exchange their views and information with another in Finland. The Internet, the communications infrastructure for the Web is a little…

UN report calls for “radical transformations” to avert global climate catastrophe

By Bryan Dyne The United Nations Environment Program issued its tenth Emissions Gap Report yesterday, which highlighted the stark failure of the 2015 Paris Agreement to curb global greenhouse gas emissions and halt global warming. Even if countries hold themselves to their…

Climate Change Is Breaking Open America’s Nuclear Tombs in Marshall Islands and Johnston Island

By James Albertini | Malu ‘Aina Center for Non-violent Education & Action 14 Nov 2019 – The Marshall Islands say that plutonium is leaking into the Pacific Ocean from the concrete dome the U.S. built to dispose of its nuclear waste. …

Climate crisis: 11,000 scientists foresee untold human suffering

by Countercurrents Collective Governments are failing to address the climate crisis, says a new study, which is based on 40 years of data on a range of measures. Another team said: Paris carbon-cutting pledges are “too little, too late”. The…

Eighth Fair of Nonviolent Initiatives was held in Quito

In the framework of Nonviolent October, this morning and afternoon was held in Cumandá Parque Urbano, in the city of Quito, the 8th Fair of Nonviolent Initiatives. Hundreds of people visited stands and participated in recreational activities, sensory, with pets,…

Lives at risk if wireless technology demands are not held in check: UN weather watchdog

Amid growing competition for radio wave space due to new wireless technologies, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) on Thursday called on governments to protect radio frequencies allocated to potentially life-saving weather forecasting services. Earth observation services vital to weather forecasts and long-term climate…

Why don’t more women win science Nobels?

Mary K. Feeney, Arizona State University for The Conversation All of the 2019 Nobel Prizes in science were awarded to men. That’s a return to business as usual, after biochemical engineer Frances Arnold won in 2018, for chemistry, and Donna…

Turing Test: why it still matters

Harry Collins, Cardiff University for The Conversation We’re entering the age of artificial intelligence. And as AI programs gets better and better at acting like humans, we will increasingly be faced with the question of whether there’s really anything that…

The fightback against Facebook is getting stronger

Leighton Andrews, Cardiff University for The Conversation Facebook leader Mark Zuckerberg recently took the unusual step of visiting lawmakers in Washington, including President Donald Trump in the White House. The reason? Congress’s anti-trust sub-committee has started demanding documents from Facebook…

Artificial Intelligence used for mass surveillance in 75 countries

By Steven Feldstein A new report from The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace finds that at least 75 countries are using facial recognition and other forms of artificial intelligence in order to surveil massive numbers of people. A growing number of…

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