Science and Technology

07.11.2019

Climate crisis: 11,000 scientists foresee untold human suffering

Climate crisis: 11,000 scientists foresee untold human suffering

by Countercurrents Collective Governments are failing to address the climate crisis, says a new study, which is based on 40 years of data on a range of measures. Another team said: Paris carbon-cutting pledges are “too little, too late”. The alarming assessments came a day after U.S. President Donald Trump… »

28.10.2019

Eighth Fair of Nonviolent Initiatives was held in Quito

Eighth Fair of Nonviolent Initiatives was held in Quito

In the framework of Nonviolent October, this morning and afternoon was held in Cumandá Parque Urbano, in the city of Quito, the 8th Fair of Nonviolent Initiatives. Hundreds of people visited stands and participated in recreational activities, sensory, with pets, brain gymnastics, among others that were registered in this fair… »

26.10.2019

Lives at risk if wireless technology demands are not held in check: UN weather watchdog

Lives at risk if wireless technology demands are not held in check: UN weather watchdog

Amid growing competition for radio wave space due to new wireless technologies, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) on Thursday called on governments to protect radio frequencies allocated to potentially life-saving weather forecasting services. Earth observation services vital to weather forecasts and long-term climate change monitoring, are having to share more… »

15.10.2019

Why don’t more women win science Nobels?

Why don’t more women win science Nobels?

Mary K. Feeney, Arizona State University for The Conversation All of the 2019 Nobel Prizes in science were awarded to men. That’s a return to business as usual, after biochemical engineer Frances Arnold won in 2018, for chemistry, and Donna Strickland received the 2018 Nobel Prize… »

03.10.2019

Turing Test: why it still matters

Turing Test: why it still matters

Harry Collins, Cardiff University for The Conversation We’re entering the age of artificial intelligence. And as AI programs gets better and better at acting like humans, we will increasingly be faced with the question of whether there’s really anything that special about our own intelligence, or if we… »

02.10.2019

The fightback against Facebook is getting stronger

The fightback against Facebook is getting stronger

Leighton Andrews, Cardiff University for The Conversation Facebook leader Mark Zuckerberg recently took the unusual step of visiting lawmakers in Washington, including President Donald Trump in the White House. The reason? Congress’s anti-trust sub-committee has started demanding documents from Facebook and other big tech firms. It’s… »

18.09.2019

Artificial Intelligence used for mass surveillance in 75 countries

Artificial Intelligence used for mass surveillance in 75 countries

By Steven Feldstein A new report from The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace finds that at least 75 countries are using facial recognition and other forms of artificial intelligence in order to surveil massive numbers of people. A growing number of states are deploying advanced AI surveillance tools to monitor,… »

16.09.2019

Five climate change science misconceptions – debunked

Five climate change science misconceptions – debunked

Mark Maslin, UCL for The Conversation The science of climate change is more than 150 years old and it is probably the most tested area of modern science. However the energy industry, political lobbyists and others have spent the last 30 years sowing doubt about the… »

09.09.2019

Linking brains to computers: how new implants are helping us achieve this goal

Linking brains to computers: how new implants are helping us achieve this goal

Yunlong Zhao, University of Surrey for The Conversation Cyborgs are no longer science fiction. The field of brain-machine interfaces (BMI) – which use electrodes, often implanted into the brain, to translate neuronal information into commands capable of controlling external systems such as a computer or robotic arm –… »

07.09.2019

Teamwork behind first picture of black hole gets recognition

Teamwork behind first picture of black hole gets recognition

Although computer scientist Katie Bouman’s was the face that most appeared on the  internet because she designed an algorithm that produced the image, the extraordinary team that produced the first picture of a black hole was one of three working closely together on one particular aspect of this project. »

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