Reporters Sans Frontières

Freedom of expression and of information will always be the world’s most important freedom. If journalists were not free to report the facts, denounce abuses and alert the public, how would we resist the problem of children-soldiers, defend women’s rights, or preserve our environment? In some countries, torturers stop their atrocious deeds as soon as they are mentioned in the media. In others, corrupt politicians abandon their illegal habits when investigative journalists publish compromising details about their activities. Still elsewhere, massacres are prevented when the international media focuses its attention and cameras on events. Freedom of information is the foundation of any democracy. Yet almost half of the world’s population is still denied it. rsf.org

30.09.2013

Threats and censorship at peak in Veracruz, Oaxaca, Michoacán and Zacatecas

Threats and censorship at peak in Veracruz, Oaxaca, Michoacán and Zacatecas

Under the successive presidencies of Vicente Fox (2000-2006) and Felipe Calderón (2006-2012), Mexico joined the ranks of the world’s 10 most dangerous countries for journalists and, more broadly, those involved in news and information. Eighty-eight were killed and a further 17 disappeared in a… »

21.09.2013

Investigative Journalist gagged in US

Investigative Journalist gagged in US

[divide][clear] Reporters Without Borders is deeply troubled by a recent gag order placed on American investigative journalist Barrett Brown and his defense team, as he faces prosecution for charges related to his work. Brown, 32, who has written for The Guardian, Huffington Post and Vanity Fair, was investigating links between the government and the private intelligence industry… »

15.09.2013

Operation Condor’s lasting impact on Latin America’s media

Operation Condor’s lasting impact on Latin America’s media

Op-ed published on 11 September on Bío Bío Nacional’s website Forty years after the Chilean military coup of 11 September 1973, Latin America’s conscience is still haunted by memories of the dust clouds from the attack on La Moneda, the presidential palace. Salvador Allende’s death and… »

01.08.2013

Manning verdict blow for investigative journalism and its sources

Manning verdict blow for investigative journalism and its sources

Reporters Without Borders regards today’s verdict in U.S. Army private Bradley Manning’s trial as dangerous. Although acquitted of “aiding the enemy,” he was found guilty of five counts of espionage and five counts of theft, for which he could receive a combined sentence of more than 100 years in prison. »

30.07.2013

“One step forward, two steps back for media freedom”

“One step forward, two steps back for media freedom”

Reporters Without Borders welcomes the action taken by the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) to tighten the guidelines its prosecutors use in investigations involving the news media, but remains concerned about the direction of media freedom in the U.S. The new guidelines were designed in response to criticism levied… »

11.06.2013

US congress urged to create commission to investigate mass snooping

US congress urged to create commission to investigate mass snooping

Reporters Without Borders calls on the US Congress to create a commission of enquiry into the links between US intelligence agencies and nine leading Internet sector companies that are alleged to have given them access to their servers. The commission should also identify all the countries and organizations that… »

09.06.2013

Bradley Manning court martial opens, restrictions limit news coverage

Bradley Manning court martial opens, restrictions limit news coverage

Reporters Without Borders greets with qualified satisfaction a decision by Col. Denise Lind, the judge in the court martial of Bradley Manning, to authorize two private stenographers to transcribe the proceedings. When the trial opened on 3 June at Fort Meade, Maryland, the Freedom of the… »

24.01.2013

Thirty Berlusconis – South American giant’s flawed media landscape

Thirty Berlusconis – South American giant’s flawed media landscape

Reporters Without Borders is today releasing a report entitled “Brazil, the country of 30 Berlusconis” that examines all of the shortcomings of this South American giant’s media landscape It is based on fact-finding visits to Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Brasilia in… »

12.12.2012

Newly adopted law discriminates against indigenous community media

Newly adopted law discriminates against indigenous community media

Reporters Without Borders reiterates its condemnation of the newly-adopted General Telecommunications Law (LGT), which will penalize small radio stations, especially indigenous community radio stations, that are waiting to be officially assigned broadcast frequencies.   Approved on third reading by the Guatemalan congress on 19 November, it was signed into law… »

07.12.2012

New law will benefit media pluralism despite polarized climate

New law will benefit media pluralism despite polarized climate

Argentina’s new law on Audiovisual Communication Services (SCA), known in Spanish as the Ley de Medios, is due to enter fully into force tomorrow. Reporters without Borders reiterates its support for the bill’s general principles and endorses its application. However, the press freedom organization regrets that it has created a… »

Newsletter

Enter your e-mail address to subscribe to our daily news service.

Follow LIVE Chile’s mobilisations 06.12.19

Documentary: UBI, our right to live

Film: The Beginning of the End of Nuclear Weapons

2nd World March for Peace and Nonviolence

Milagro Sala

International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

Archives

Except where otherwise note, content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.